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Cinepoetry

Award Winners:

2019 REELpoetry Judges' Award:

The Opened Field

Helmie Stil, filmmaker

Dom Bury, poet

Helmie Stil is a Dutch filmmaker living and working in the UK. After graduating from the Utrecht School of Arts, she has researched, directed and produced her own films since 2006. She loves making poetic documentaries and film poems. Her award-winning documentaries and film poems have been shown on national television (UK) and at international film festivals. Her film The Desktop Metaphor won the Weimar Poetry Film Award 2018. She is the director and founder of Poetry Cinema: Films Inspired by Poetry.

Poet Dom Bury runs workshops on nature, ecopoetry and the emotional impact of climate change. His poems have been published in places such as Poetry Review, Poetry London, Poetry Ireland Review, Poetry Wales, Magma, Ambit, Iota, The North, Oxford Poetry, The New European and Best British Poetry 2014. He is a recipient of an Eric Gregory Award, a Jerwood/Arvon Mentorship, and he has won The National Poetry Competition, The Magma Poetry Prize, 2nd Prize in The Resurgence Ecopoetry Competition and was named as a finalist in the Ballymaloe International Poetry Competition.

2019 REELpoetry Audience Choice Award:

I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast

Dan Sickles, filmmaker

Melissa Studdard, poet

Dan Sickles is a filmmaker, actor, and writer living in New York City and Paris, France. His first film, MALA MALA, premiered at the TriBeCa Film Festival in 2014 to widespread critical acclaim. His second film, DINA, received the Grand Jury Prize for U.S. Documentary at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, as well as the 2017 International Documentary Association award for Best Feature Film. He is the recipient of the PEEK Award and the ARC Alliance Community Service Award for his work within neurodiverse communities, and his production company, El Peligro, has been honored by the Social Media Impact Awards and Amnesty International for their approach at socially-conscious storytelling.

Melissa Studdard is the author of the poetry collection I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast and the young adult novel Six Weeks to Yehidah. Her writings have appeared or are forthcoming in The Guardian, The New York Times, Psychology Today, Poetry, Harvard Review, New Ohio Review, Poets & Writers, and more. Her awards include the Forward National Literature Award, the International Book Award, the Kathak Literary Award, and more. In addition to writing, she serves as executive producer and host of VIDA Voices & Views for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts and president of the Women’s Caucus for AWP.

 

 

 

From 7 Seas by Kyra Clegg

"Cinepoetry" is a broad umbrella term to reference an original poetic artwork that can be screened or projected. As such, it functions at the intersections of poetry, film, video and cinema, with frequent collaborations with other artists, such as musicians, fine artists, graffiti artists, singers, dancers, etc.

Cinepoetry as a genre first emerged in the 1920s with Man Ray’s largely surrealistic short films, which he called “cinepoems.” The style of the cinepoems in this festival range from traditional to experimental poetry and visuals.  Submissions came in from all over the U.S., as well as from Austria, Australia, Canada, England, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Scotland, Taiwan and Ukraine.

In addition to the screenings, discussions and a workshop on cinepoetry will take place. Come prepared to be entertained and possibly inspired to create.

Bios and Artist Statements: Cinepoets & Collaborators

7 Seas

Kyra Clegg, artist and filmmaker

Kyra Clegg is a multimedia Scottish artist based on the northeast coast of Scotland. Exhibiting nationally and internationally, her moving image works have been shown in film festivals in the UK, US, Germany, France and Estonia. In 2005 she was commissioned to undertake a mixed media installation based on the poetry of Emily Dickinson for StAnza, Scotland’s international poetry festival  whose theme for that year was Stateside Poets.

ARTIST STATEMENT: 7Seas is a short film work which  presents seven extracts from Dickinson’s poetry which reference the sea. Each poem extract is followed by a moving image work – the intention being to create a dialogue between the image and the word. The landscape of the Scottish sea coast is a constant presence and source of inspiration. The opportunity to relate to Emily Dickinson’s unique take on this liminal environment, which she claimed never to have seen, has enabled me to look at it afresh.

14 Sentences

Carolyn Guinzio, poet and filmmaker

Carolyn Guinzio is the author of six collections:  How Much of What Falls Will Be Left When It Gets to the Ground? (Tolsun Books, 2018), Ozark Crows (Spuyten-Duyvil, 2018), Spine  (Parlor Press, 2016), Spoke & Dark, (Red Hen, 2012),  selected by Alice Quinn as winner of the To The Lighthouse/A Room Of Her Own Prize, Quarry  (Parlor Press, 2008), and West Pullman  (Bordighera, 2005), winner of the Bordighera Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Harvard Review, Agni, Boston Review, Bomb, Blackbird and many other journals. She co-edited the online project YEW: A Journal of Innovative Writing & Images By Women. Her films have been official selections at the Poetry Film & Video Symposium and the Fayetteville Film Festival. Her photographs have appeared on the covers of the numerous poetry books and literary magazines including Conjunctions, December and New American Writing. A Chicago native, she has lived with her family in the Ozark Mountains just outside Fayetteville, Arkansas, since 2002.

“America” By Julia Vinograd

David Mai, director

Barbara West, performer

Julia Vinograd, poet

Barbara West’s unique performance style comes from her background in theater and rock n’ roll. It is less like poetry reading and more like a cross between stand-up comedy and stand-up meditation. Barbara’s 16 years as a student of Shambhala Buddhism and 12-step Recovery provide the spiritual foundation for her work. She has been writing poetry since age 6, but stopped several years ago when her file cabinet filled up. Thanks to support from the Sacramento and Davis poetry communities, she’s thrilled to be writing again. Her publications include Full of Crow, Brevities, Medusa’sKitchen, Sacramento Voices, Swarthmore College Bulletin, Small Craft Warnings, Escarp, and Davis Shambhala Center Newsletter. Barbara enjoys reciting from memory, which allows her to use her whole body to present a poem, usually without a mic, since her voice is plenty loud.  She also enjoys windsurfing.

David Mai is a filmmaker who has directed over a dozen short films and has been on student and professional sets. His focus is on post-production as he primarily works as a picture editor. His interests include horror, sexuality, and feminist film theory. In addition to editing multiple short to feature length films, he is proficient with industry-grade cinematography, lighting, and sound equipment. With knowledge of a variety of software, he is adept at cutting film, mixing sound, and designing motion graphics and VFX. Furthermore, he has participated in conferences and published papers in media scholarship. Critical theory is as important to him as filmmaking.

America

Lisa Seidenberg, filmmaker

Lisa Seidenberg has worked in electronic media for many years starting as a journalist in broadcast television and radio in  international locations. As an independent filmmaker, she produced  long-form pieces on history and social issues but she tired of the documentary form and began exploring more artistically challenging genres, including collage, re-mix, projections and installations. Her work has appeared at multiple festivals, including The International Berlin Film Festival, London Documentary Festival, Zebra Poetry Film Festival (Germany), Newlyn Film Festival (UK), Experiments in Cinema (USA), Juteback Film Festival (USA), O'Bhreal Poetry Film Festival (Ireland), Figueroa de Foz Festival (Portugal), and in various galleries and art exhibitions.

ARTIST STATEMENT: My work blurs the boundaries of documentary and experimental genres; often addressing the politics of image-making or the shaping of collective history. My work has been described as "serious humor," i.e. serious subjects with a witty or humorous edge. Recent work combines video with poetry and other text.  Major influences are Chantal Akerman, Werner Herzog and Chris Marker.

Aral

Eta Dahlia, filmmaker, poet

Eta Dahlia is a Russian poet and filmmaker based in London. His work combines minimalist Russian poetry with a range of other audio-visual media. He works with spoken word, images, colors and music, integrating these elements into inseparable rhythmic and rhyming compositions to create coherent and complete multimedia poetic pieces. One of his goals is to strive to achieve a universal type of a poem, where the understanding and appreciation of the piece is not limited to its original language.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Aral is a short video poem exploring ways of blending and merging spoken and written word through a story of a man with an unconventional desire to be a ship. The narrative follows the struggle of a human being unable to accomplish his existential dream.

As We Embrace

Amang Hung, poet, filmmaker

Amang Hung was born and raised on the scenic east coast of Taiwan. She is the author of four volumes of verse, On/Off: Selected Poems of Amang, 1995-2002 (2003), No Daddy (2008), Chariots of Women (2016) and As We Embrace Thousands Are Dying (2016). Her work has appeared in various print and online journals in Asia and the United States. An avid blogger and mountaineer, Amang makes video documentaries and video poems.  Her first documentary, Express Mail, Address Unknown was featured at the 2011 Women Make Waves Film Festival in Taiwan. Poetry film Hot Spring Museum screened for one month at Beitou Hot Spring Museum. Poetry films Amniotic Fluid, oceans apart & MORE THAN ONE screened online by AXW Film Festival.

ARTIST STATEMENT: I made this film based on the title poem of one of my poetry collections, As We Embrace Thousands Are Dying (2016), which is a pretty long poem and expresses fully about the doubt and possibility of love I feel in this ruthless world. However, I made a very short film for it , with random numbers to show the unpredictable human fate, and very few words, only repeating the very first line over and over again to serve as a vision sutra chanting. Hope it can also give some comfort, since years go by but our world does not become better.

Body Language

Margo Stutts Toombs, videographer and editor

Loueva Smith, poet

Roslyn (Cookie) Wells, graphic artist

Lydia Hance, dancer and choreographer

Margo Stutts Toombs’ screenings and awards are multitudinous. A sampling includes music video, Let Love Be the Change (Silver Remi at WorldFest Film Festival and won a second place at the My Hero Film Festival; music video, Bitch Is Ready for Tea (screened at Gulf Coast Film and Video Festival Houston Fringe Festival); short video, A Day at Work (best art video, Digital Storytelling Contest and honorable mention at My Hero Film Festival).

Loueva Smith (Poet) is the author of Consequences of a Moonless Night, the 2015 winner of the Robert Phillips Chapbook Prize, given by Texas Review Press. She is one of four contributors, Larry D. Thomas, Jack B. Bedell, Sarah Cortez, and Loueva Smith, along with Dan Streck, photographer, in the ekphrastic volume, Vanishing Points: Poems And Photographs Of Texas Roadside Memorials.” In 2018, her poem The Dead Weight of Dogs, was a finalist in the Rattle poetry contest.

Roslyn (Cookie) Wells worked for many years in the commercial graphic world, and she moved to painting in watercolor for its loose and flowing qualities. She is a member of Houston Watercolor Art Society with several awards. She has had numerous one-woman shows at Archway Gallery and two shows at The Cloister in Houston.

Lydia Hance (Dancer/Choreographer) is the founder and artistic director of Frame Dance. She was named an emerging leader by Dance/USA and has led Frame Dance in performances from the Galveston pier to the METRO light rail, in the backs of U Haul trucks, downtown tunnels, and into museums, stages, and warehouses for the past 10 years. A champion of new music composers, her work deepens interdisciplinary and multigenerational collaborations, and investigates the placement of dance in our lives. She is a choreographer, curator, filmmaker, educator and dance writer who passionately believes dance should be a part of our everyday lives. She holds degrees in dance performance and English literature from SMU and trained at the Taylor School, Graham School, Tisch School of the Arts, Limon Institute and SMU.

Capricorn

Eta Dahlia, filmmaker

Andrey Novikov, original score

Nik Nightingale, calligraphy

Eta Dahlia is a Russian poet and filmmaker based in London. His work combines minimalist Russian poetry with a range of other audio-visual media. He works with spoken word, images, colors and music, integrating these elements into inseparable rhythmic and rhyming compositions to create coherent and complete multimedia poetic pieces. One of his goals is to strive to achieve a universal type of a poem, where the understanding and appreciation of the piece is not limited to its original language.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Capricorn (Козерог) is a video poem that aims to create a new type of poetic language, integrating spoken word with moving image and not merely echoing or illustrating the spoken word with visuals. The video poem presented here is part of an album of thirteen compositions called Tsvetochki, which combine spoken word, images, colors and music to create coherent and complete multimedia poetic pieces. The project aims to integrate the audio-visual elements into inseparable rhythmic and rhyming compositions. This approach strives to reach a universal type of poem, where the natural language of the spoken word is only a part of the composition and the knowledge of this language does not limit the understanding and appreciation of the piece. The name Tsvetochki means “little flowers” in Russian and alludes to the size of the poems in the album, which are exceptionally short, sometimes only three words long

Echoes

Hanna-Mari Ojala, cinepoet

Hanna-Mari Ojala (Finland) is the author of Studying in a Way, In This Country Syrup Is a Rare Treat and Death of an Imaginary Lover. She is an award-winning cinepoet who has has created over a dozen cinepoems, and Solitude and Echoes both won at the Avalonia Festival III last year.

A Family Recipe That Cannot Be Followed or Written Down

Elaine Zhang, director

Tiana Wang, poet

Elaine Zhang is a recent graduate of Yale University and a film director based in the Los Angeles area. Her work has been official selections at 13 film festivals in the US, UK and Canada. As a writer/director, she is also the recipient of 1st prize & Best Original Play for China Central Television's “Star of Outlook” Drama Competition.She is currently finishing her master's degree in film/TV management at Carnegie Mellon University.

Tiana Wang is a current undergraduate at Yale University. Her work has been recognized by the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association, the Live Poets Society of New Jersey, and the English department at Yale University.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Pairing a culturally-specific narrative of making jasmine tea with the highly personal one of grieving for a loved one, "A Family Recipe that Cannot be Followed Written Down" aims to illuminate a uniquely Chinese experience of remembrance. The loss of a close relative, especially for the Chinese-American community, has largely remained an undiscussed topic in popular media. We chose the medium of a poetry film in order to evoke a distinctly Chinese mode of expression—China’s literary tradition historically emphasizes the interaction of feeling and atmosphere, and the format of this film lends itself to supporting this interaction.

In contrast to mainstream media that normalizes the reduction of Asian-American characters to flat, stereotypical foils, "A Family Recipe that Cannot be Followed Written Down" showcases the unique narrative voice of a Chinese-American female protagonist. In order to come to terms with her loss, the protagonist must reconcile the cultural differences between her American way of thinking and her father’s distinctly Chinese rituals by using a shared Chinese childhood experience to bridge them.

The film is led by an experienced Chinese-American actress, who shares the identity of a first-generation immigrant with her character. We also have a team of Asian and Asian-American filmmakers filling all the major artistic roles (writer, director, producer). By grounding the universal act of mourning within rituals specific to a marginalized culture, we explore the disconnect between first-generation children and their immigrant parents in the film. At the same time, the film celebrates the possibility of new rituals emerging from loss—a synthesis of cultures initially assumed to be disparate.

Hanging

Hanna-Mari Ojala, cinepoet

Hanna-Mari Ojala (Finland) is the author of Studying in a Way, In This Country Syrup Is a Rare Treat and Death of an Imaginary Lover. She is an award-winning cinepoet who has has created over a dozen cinepoems, and Solitude and Echoes both won at the Avalonia Festival III last year.

Home

David Knox, director and cinematographer

Erin Fornoff, poet

Erin Fornoff hails from the Appalachian mountains of North Carolina. Based in Dublin, she has performed her poetry at dozens of festivals and events across Ireland, the US, and the UK including Glastonbury, Electric Picnic, Cúirt, and a national Irish tour with viral poet Hollie McNish. She has featured at Hozier and James Taylor concerts and collaborated on a large-scale street art and film project, The Volunteers, with artist Joe Caslin in 2017.  Her poem “Thigh” was included in Best New English and Irish Poets 2016 and her poem “To Make Things” was commissioned by RTE for national broadcast and performance at Dublin Castle in front of a crowd of 4000. In 2014 she was a part of the Poetry Ireland Introductions Series. She has been published and anthologized in The Stinging Fly, Cyphers, New Planet Cabaret, The Irish Times, Icarus, Penduline, and many others.  Her poem “Hymn to the Reckless” was featured on posters and curriculum nationwide for Ireland’s National Poetry Day. Her poetry and writing has been featured on BBC3 and national radio across Ireland.  She was co-founder and programme director for Lingo, Ireland's first ever spokenword festival. In 2015 she received an Arts Council bursary for her first novel Better People. In 2014 she received an M. Phil in creative writing with distinction from Trinity College Dublin.

Ice Fog

Vanessa Zimmer-Powel, poet and creator

Vanessa Zimmer-Powell, a Houston poet and lover of photography, is the first place winner of the 2017 and 2016 Houston Poetry Fest ekphrastic competitions, and third place winner of the 2017 Friendswood Library ekphrastic poetry competition. Her poetry has aired on the radio and has been published in various journals and anthologies including: Austin Poetry Fest anthologies, AvocetBlue HoleBearing the Mask, Borderlands: Texas Poetry ReviewChaffey ReviewCopperfield Review, Echoes of the Cordiellera, Ekphrasis, Enchantment of the OrdinaryHistorical Feathers, Historical Feathers, Houston Poetry Fest Anthologies, San Pedro River Review, Texas Poetry Calendar anthologies, Untamable City, and Weaving the Terrain. Her chapbook is Woman Looks into an Eye.

ARTIST STATEMENT: In the summer of 2018 my grandmother, who I was very close to, died. I helped to care for her in the last two months before her death, and was with her on the day she died. Shortly after, a good friend's wife died and that friend visited me. Her grief lay upon my grief and was almost palpable. I was still affected by this emotion when I heard about Reel Poetry, in the fall of 2018, and it naturally emerged in my cine poem. I am an avid amateur photographer and often use my photography as a tool for writing poetry to bring me back to a place of inspiration. As I took the photographs of the ice fog, I was in a crazy rapture, in awe of the beauty, and was excited to be able to use these images to create a cine poem. It was a lovely experience to have the words come to the images as I sewed everything together into a visual medium.

Instructions for Soldiers Back From War

Jed Bell, director

Barbara West, performer

David Mai, cinematography and editing

Julia Vinograd, poet

Barbara West’s unique performance style comes from her background in theater and rock n’ roll. It is less like poetry reading and more like a cross between stand-up comedy and stand-up meditation. Barbara’s 16 years as a student of Shambhala Buddhism and 12-step Recovery provide the spiritual foundation for her work. She has been writing poetry since age 6, but stopped several years ago when her file cabinet filled up. Thanks to support from the Sacramento and Davis poetry communities, she’s thrilled to be writing again. Her publications include Full of Crow, Brevities, Medusa’sKitchen, Sacramento Voices, Swarthmore College Bulletin, Small Craft Warnings, Escarp, and Davis Shambhala Center Newsletter. Barbara enjoys reciting from memory, which allows her to use her whole body to present a poem, usually without a mic, since her voice is plenty loud.  She also enjoys windsurfing.

David Mai is a filmmaker who has directed over a dozen short films and has been on student and professional sets. His focus is on post-production as he primarily works as a picture editor. His interests include horror, sexuality, and feminist film theory. In addition to editing multiple short to feature length films, he is proficient with industry-grade cinematography, lighting, and sound equipment. With knowledge of a variety of software, he is adept at cutting film, mixing sound, and designing motion graphics and VFX. Furthermore, he has participated in conferences and published papers in media scholarship. Critical theory is as important to him as filmmaking.

I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast

Dan Sickles, filmmaker

Melissa Studdard, poet

Dan Sickles is a filmmaker, actor, and writer living in New York City and Paris, France. His first film, MALA MALA, premiered at the TriBeCa Film Festival in 2014 to widespread critical acclaim. His second film, DINA, received the Grand Jury Prize for U.S. Documentary at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, as well as the 2017 International Documentary Association award for Best Feature Film. He is the recipient of the PEEK Award and the ARC Alliance Community Service Award for his work within neurodiverse communities, and his production company, El Peligro, has been honored by the Social Media Impact Awards and Amnesty International for their approach at socially-conscious storytelling.

Melissa Studdard is the author of the poetry collection I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast and the young adult novel Six Weeks to Yehidah. Her writings have appeared or are forthcoming in The Guardian, The New York Times, Psychology Today, Poetry, Harvard Review, New Ohio Review, Poets & Writers, and more. Her awards include the Forward National Literature Award, the International Book Award, the Kathak Literary Award, and more. In addition to writing, she serves as executive producer and host of VIDA Voices & Views for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts and president of the Women’s Caucus for AWP.

ARTIST STATEMENT:  With "I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast," I wanted to convey that if we pause at almost any moment in the narrative of being, we'll find both the mystical and the mundane, connection and solitude, complexity and simplicity. The poem is not about the pancake or the meal; it’s about the pause. It’s about the fact that we are all microcosms of the divine, and, therefore connected. Even more than connected, we are one. Like the egg, which is both whole and an ingredient, we are part and whole too.  I love the film specifically because Dan Sickles avoids the predominant metaphor and related imagery to instead tap into the elemental. By pairing the textual imagery with this new visual imagery, he further elicits the sense of creation, sustenance, and primordial divinity at the heart of “I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast.” Rather than timidly toeing the periphery of the poem, he braves the thick inner brushland and cuts new paths back out. That is as it should be. His job was not to merely represent my poem. It was to use it as a foundation for a new work of art.

I Remember

Lisa Seidenberg, filmmaker

Lisa Seidenberg has worked in electronic media for many years starting as a journalist in broadcast television and radio in  international locations. As an independent filmmaker, she produced  long-form pieces on history and social issues but she tired of the documentary form and began exploring more artistically challenging genres, including collage, re-mix, projections and installations. Her work has appeared at multiple festivals, including The International Berlin Film Festival, London Documentary Festival, Zebra Poetry Film Festival (Germany), Newlyn Film Festival (UK), Experiments in Cinema (USA), Juteback Film Festival (USA), O'Bhreal Poetry Film Festival (Ireland), Figueroa de Foz Festival (Portugal), and in various galleries and art exhibitions.

ARTIST STATEMENT: My work blurs the boundaries of documentary and experimental genres; often addressing the politics of image-making or the shaping of collective history. My work has been described as "serious humor," i.e. serious subjects with a witty or humorous edge. Recent work combines video with poetry and other text.  Major influences are Chantal Akerman, Werner Herzog and Chris Marker.

Leisure

A D Cooper, cinepoet and director

After an award-winning stint as advertising copywriter and screenwriter, A D Cooper started directing in 2010, completing  a slate of short dramas from her own scripts.  The Flask (2011, 7m) was a museum installation while many others for Hurcheon Films have all been selected for festivals and nominated for awards: Feet (2010), The view from the window (2012) and Stranger Danger (2012), and Ace (2013) winner of several awards including Best Short. Combining her advertising experience with filmmaking, she’s directed corporates for London production company Schmick. Included in her thick resume are A Small Dot on the Western Front (presented both as film and on stage, and now developed as a feature script), Writing the Peace (award-winning short documentary), Spring on the Strand (experimental self-shot cinepoem), The Penny Dropped (multi-award-winning supernatural short), and Home to the Hangers (on poet Edward Thomas, a winner in Directors UK Challenge, a Best British Short award, and a special award from the Imperial War Museum). She’s currently working on two dance shorts and a dark comedy short.

A Lost Penny

Madeleine Clair, cinepoet

Madeleine Clair is an actress, editor and composer, known for Pickpocket (2018), Je suis un sou perdu (2018) and Je ne joue plus (2016). Her cinepoem A Lost Penny won the Special Jury Award for the Best Silent Film at Independent Talents International Film Festival in October 2018.

Moments

Brett Chapman, director, writer

Brett Chapman trained as a journalist at The University of Sheffield and after graduating began developing a unique style of filmmaking that meshes a tactile and handmade aesthetic with emotionally open storytelling. The use of obsolete and archaic technology in his films has been a staple of his work and aesthetic.

ARTIST STATEMENT: I'm really interested in the way different mediums of communication impact the truth of what people share, both online and in the real world.

Mrigtrishna (Mirage)

Rantu Chetia, poet and director

Rantu Chetia is an editor and director who hails from Assam, in Northeast India. He studied editing at the Film and Television Institute of India. He currently resides in Mumbai and has been involved in more than 25 projects as either associate editor or as an independent editor. He has worked in projects of well-known and respected Indian film directors, and he was awarded best editor for the independent Assamese feature film Bokul at North East India’s reputed Prag Cine Award in 2016. Mrigtrishna: Mirage is his second poem-based short film as a director.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Mumbai has been the city of dreams for ages. Millions, from the nook and corner of India, come here every day to try out their luck in the film world of Bollywood. Only a handful get their dreams realized though. The rest are left to face the harsh realities of life and the dilemma of their existence. The primary question that constantly hounds them is the motive of their life here in Mumbai.

The poem tries to portray this very existential query of the protagonist, who is a struggling actor and has left behind the joyous and playful life of the village. In the poem, he is missing those narrow lanes, the huge fields, the river, those carefree people and his girlfriend. He is reflecting upon the decisions he has taken in life which have turned his fate against him. The poem leaves him in a confused state of mind.

My Cloverfield

Hanna-Mari Ojala, cinepoet

Hanna-Mari Ojala (Finland) is the author of Studying in a Way, In This Country Syrup Is a Rare Treat and Death of an Imaginary Lover. She is an award-winning cinepoet who has has created over a dozen cinepoems, and Solitude and Echoes both won at the Avalonia Festival III last year.

The Names of Trees

Jack Cochran, filmmaker and poet

Pamela Falkenberg, filmmaker and writer

Lucy English, poet and author

Jack Cochran is an independent filmmaker who has produced, directed, or shot a variety of experimental and personal projects. As a DP he has extensive experience shooting commercials, independent features and documentaries. His features and documentaries have shown at the Sundance, Raindance, Telluride, Tribeca, Edinburgh, Chicago, Houston and Taos film festivals, winning several honors. His commercials and documentaries have won Silver Lions from Cannes, a BAFTA (British Academy Award), Peabody Awards and Cable Aces. Some notable credits: Director of Photography on Brian Griffin's “Claustrofoamia,” Cinematography for Antony Thomas’ “Tank Man,” Director/Cinematographer of “Viento Nocturno,” and Cinematographer of Ramin Niami’s feature film “Paris.”

Pamela Falkenberg is an independent filmmaker who received her PhD from University of Iowa and taught at Northern Illinois University, St.Mary's College and University of Notre Dame. She directed the largest student film society in the U.S. while she was at University of Iowa, and also ran film series for Snite Museum of Art in South Bend, Indiana. Her experimental film with Dan Curry, Open Territory, received an individual filmmaker grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as grants from the Center for New Television and the Indiana Arts Council. Open Territory screened at the Pacific Film Archives, as well at numerous film festivals, including the AFI Video Festival, and was nominated for a regional Emmy. Her other films include museum installations, scholarly/academic hybrid works shown at film conferences, and a documentary commissioned by the Peace Institute at University of Notre Dame. Pam is an occasional contributor to “Moving Poems Magazine”

Lucy English was born in Sri Lanka and grew up in London. She studied English and American Literature at University of East Anglia and has an MA in creative writing from Bath Spa University. She is the author of three novels and the poetry collection Prayer to Imperfection (Burning Eye Books, 2014), but is best known as a performance poet, first winning the Bristol Poetry Slam in 1996 and going on to tour worldwide performing her poetry at many international festivals. She has toured Sri Lanka, India, Thailand and Taiwan with the British Council, running workshops and performances. In 2010-11, she toured the UK with the acclaimed Arts Council sponsored multimedia poetry show Flash and in 2014-5 toured with Count Me In. She is co-creator of the poetry film organization Liberated Words, which curates and screens poetry films. She created the digital poetry film project, The Book of Hours, which was shortlisted for the New Media Writing Award, and twice long-listed for the Sabotage Awards. Two of the Book of Hours films won the first and second prize for the 2018 Atticus Review Videopoem Contest.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Jack Cochran & Pamela Falkenberg

Jack Cochran and Pamela Falkenberg are making personal films together again under the name Outlier Moving Pictures. They hope their new films will be worthy of the name -- avoiding the usual patterns and approaching their subject matter from the margins (which sounds better than saying that as filmmakers they're oddballs and cranks).  Jack has written poetry all his life, but he never knew what to do with it until he shared his notebooks with Pam, who said, "You're a filmmaker -- shouldn't your poems be films?” Pam wants to make lots of different kinds of films with Jack, but she is especially proud to have been the one who suggested that Jack's poems should be made into films.

New Note

Ally Christmas, cinepoet

Ally Christmas (b. 1991) is from Northern Virginia, and she currently lives and works out of Grinnell, IA, where she is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in new media and lecturer in art. She received her BA in studio art from University of Virginia in 2013 and her MFA in photo & video from University of Georgia in 2018. Her work and research have won awards at the National Conference for the Society for Photographic Education, the 4’33” Spotlight on Scholarship competition at the University of Georgia, and from the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts. Christmas works primarily with lens-based media and her practice is characterized by a constant process of filling and emptying – of materials, of time, of herself.

ARTIST STATEMENT: After three years of questioning of my selfhood - a deeply unsettling tic that set in somewhere between lying awake at 2:32am and trying to remember where I left my optimism - I’ve come back to flesh. My flesh, most likely. A convulsion of uncontrollable sighs and sitting alone in the dark wondering who “Ally” is anyway. You know what I mean? And another thing - I’ve finally stopped counting the ceiling tiles, but I did start grinding my teeth.

The Opened Field

Helmie Stil, filmmaker

Dom Bury, poet

Helmie Stil is a Dutch filmmaker living and working in the UK. After graduating from the Utrecht School of Arts, she has researched, directed and produced her own films since 2006. She loves making poetic documentaries and film poems. Her award-winning documentaries and film poems have been shown on national television (UK) and at international film festivals. Her film The Desktop Metaphor won the Weimar Poetry Film Award 2018. She is the director and founder of Poetry Cinema: Films Inspired by Poetry.

Poet Dom Bury runs workshops on nature, ecopoetry and the emotional impact of climate change. His poems have been published in places such as Poetry Review, Poetry London, Poetry Ireland Review, Poetry Wales, Magma, Ambit, Iota, The North, Oxford Poetry, The New European and Best British Poetry 2014. He is a recipient of an Eric Gregory Award, a Jerwood/Arvon Mentorship, and he has won The National Poetry Competition, The Magma Poetry Prize, 2nd Prize in The Resurgence Ecopoetry Competition and was named as a finalist in the Ballymaloe International Poetry Competition.

Plasticnic

Fiona Tinwei Lam, writer, narrator and producer

Tisha Deb Pillai, animator

Tinjun Niu, sound designer

Fiona Tinwei Lam is a Scottish-born, Vancouver-based Canadian writer of prose and poetry.  Her poetry collection, Intimate Distances was a finalist for the City of Vancouver Book Award. She edited The Bright Well: Canadian Poems on Facing Cancer.  Her work appears in over thirty anthologies, including The Best of the Best Canadian Poetry: 10th Anniversary Edition and Forcefield: 77 Women Poets of BC. Her poetry videos have screened at festivals locally and internationally, including the Zebra poetry festival in Germany in 2018.  She teaches at Simon Fraser University's Continuing Studies.  Her new collection of poems, Odes & Laments, is forthcoming with Caitlin Press in 2019. Fiona has created four video poems in collaboration with others to date (all which have screened at international festivals or events, including Athens, Delhi, Buenos Aires, Budapest, Hong Kong, Minneapolis, Seattle, Portland, L.A.). Two of these poetry videos have screened at Germany's biannual Zebra Poetry Film Festival (2013 and 2017). Her current project in progress uses animated kinetic text and like Plasticnic (screened at this festival) is also about plastic pollution, and is related to her forthcoming book of poems that will be published in Canada this autumn.

Scarce Shelter in the Red Storm

Cindy St. Onge, multimedia artist

Cindy St. Onge is an award-winning multimedia poet based in the Pacific Northwest. Her video poems have screened at Juteback (Colorado), Silk Road (Kazakstan), O'Bheal (Cork) Athens (Greece), the Bath Fringe Festival, Festival Silencio in Lisbon, Blissfest in Denver and Rabbit Heart in Worcester. Her video poems have also been showcased at Moving Poems, Poetry Film Live, Versewrights, Writing Without Paper, and Poetry Seen. Her poems have been published in numerous print and online journals, including Right Hand Pointing, American Journal of Poetry, Dappled Things and Timberline Review. She has also contributed poetic text and voice work in collaborations with other filmmakers and multimedia artists such as Swoon (Marc Neys), Marie Craven, and Paul Broderick.

ARTIST STATEMENT: “Scare Shelter in the Red Storm” is the fifth, and the flagship video poem in the Red Storm series. This group of poems came through, in a telegraphed manner, between October and December of 2017. The series, on the surface, ruminates on the aftermath of a culture clash and then ultimately a failed marriage between my Japanese husband and me, his American wife. Stages of attraction and obsession move into friction and rejection before the doomed pairing culminates in a violent and humiliating dissolution. In “Scarce Shelter in the Red Storm,” the point of view seethes from the humiliation of being used, degraded, and finally assaulted. She wants revenge, but she’s cautious of repercussions. The video exteriors were filmed at the Portland Japanese Garden and The Grotto. The musical outro, “Sakura, Sakura,” is a souvenir music box version of the song I chose to accompany my walk down the aisle at my Buddhist wedding, in 1992.

The poem series was a year-long undertaking,  composed of six completed videos and seven poems. As I revised the poems and their translations, and completed the components of their respective videos, I had hoped the project might expiate some of my anger, or at least excavate a deeper understanding of the events that inspired the work,  but I think in the end, the work bloomed from mania, and if I’m being honest, the desires that led me all those years ago into the relationship, were also based in manic fixation. Even so, these poems arose from a rich and difficult place, and I’ve tried to open to this process faithfully, to be a receptive conduit for what have become the Red Storm Poems, and hope that I’ve managed somehow, to salvage fragments of beauty from the wreckage.

Semechki

Eta Dahlia, filmmaker

Iris Colomb, gestural drawings

Eta Dahlia is a Russian poet and filmmaker based in London. His work combines minimalist Russian poetry with a range of other audio-visual media. He works with spoken word, images, colors and music, integrating these elements into inseparable rhythmic and rhyming compositions to create coherent and complete multimedia poetic pieces. One of his goals is to strive to achieve a universal type of a poem, where the understanding and appreciation of the piece is not limited to its original language.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Semechki (Семечки) is a series of experimental translations of Eta Dahlia’s minimalist Russian poems into gestural drawings by Iris Colomb. These translations are entirely process-led. The translator made use of her limited knowledge of Russian, allowing her to experience the poems phonically without semantic bias. Translating the poems’ sounds into gestures became the basis of her systemic approach. Throughout this process her repetitive gestural sequences produced an increasingly intricate network of lines, generating a tightly layered shape. Her movements evolved with each iteration, the drawing itself exposing their range. This film shows a creation of one of the original drawings from the Semechki collection.

The Shadow

Jack Cochran, filmmaker and poet

Pamela Falkenberg, filmmaker and writer

Lucy English, poet and author

Jack Cochran is an independent filmmaker who has produced, directed, or shot a variety of experimental and personal projects. As a DP he has extensive experience shooting commercials, independent features and documentaries. His features and documentaries have shown at the Sundance, Raindance, Telluride, Tribeca, Edinburgh, Chicago, Houston and Taos film festivals, winning several honors. His commercials and documentaries have won Silver Lions from Cannes, a BAFTA (British Academy Award), Peabody Awards and Cable Aces. Some notable credits: Director of Photography on Brian Griffin's “Claustrofoamia,” Cinematography for Antony Thomas’ “Tank Man,” Director/Cinematographer of “Viento Nocturno,” and Cinematographer of Ramin Niami’s feature film “Paris.”

Pamela Falkenberg is an independent filmmaker who received her PhD from University of Iowa and taught at Northern Illinois University, St.Mary's College and University of Notre Dame. She directed the largest student film society in the U.S. while she was at University of Iowa, and also ran film series for Snite Museum of Art in South Bend, Indiana. Her experimental film with Dan Curry, Open Territory, received an individual filmmaker grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as grants from the Center for New Television and the Indiana Arts Council. Open Territory screened at the Pacific Film Archives, as well at numerous film festivals, including the AFI Video Festival, and was nominated for a regional Emmy. Her other films include museum installations, scholarly/academic hybrid works shown at film conferences, and a documentary commissioned by the Peace Institute at University of Notre Dame. Pam is an occasional contributor to “Moving Poems Magazine”

Lucy English was born in Sri Lanka and grew up in London. She studied English and American Literature at University of East Anglia and has an MA in creative writing from Bath Spa University. She is the author of three novels and the poetry collection Prayer to Imperfection (Burning Eye Books, 2014), but is best known as a performance poet, first winning the Bristol Poetry Slam in 1996 and going on to tour worldwide performing her poetry at many international festivals. She has toured Sri Lanka, India, Thailand and Taiwan with the British Council, running workshops and performances. In 2010-11, she toured the UK with the acclaimed Arts Council sponsored multimedia poetry show Flash and in 2014-5 toured with Count Me In. She is co-creator of the poetry film organization Liberated Words, which curates and screens poetry films. She created the digital poetry film project, The Book of Hours, which was shortlisted for the New Media Writing Award, and twice long-listed for the Sabotage Awards. Two of the Book of Hours films won the first and second prize for the 2018 Atticus Review Videopoem Contest.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Jack Cochran and Pamela Falkenberg are making personal films together again under the name Outlier Moving Pictures. They hope their new films will be worthy of the name -- avoiding the usual patterns and approaching their subject matter from the margins (which sounds better than saying that as filmmakers they're oddballs and cranks).  Jack has written poetry all his life, but he never knew what to do with it until he shared his notebooks with Pam, who said, "You're a filmmaker -- shouldn't your poems be films?” Pam wants to make lots of different kinds of films with Jack, but she is especially proud to have been the one who suggested that Jack's poems should be made into films.

Shiver

Mark Niehus, poet, director, producer and composer

Poet and artist Mark Niehus combines his poetry with digital art, video and music to create outcomes that capture and expand the mood, rhythms and meaning of his writing. After spending years abroad, travelling, studying creative writing and working as a new media designer in London, Mark returned to Australia to publish his first book of poems in 2008 and to focus his artistic practice to create high quality artworks integrated with his writing. Over the last 10 years Mark has conceived and delivered an array of poetry films, projection art, street art, illustrations, installations and has composed spontaneous poems for the public on his typewriter for local government, arts organizations, festivals and numerous solo exhibitions 

ARTIST STATEMENT: I write quickly and instinctively, allowing an interplay between my subconscious and conscious mind until the narrative appears. Writing for me is a very visual experience resulting in vivid imagery which easily translates to film giving the poem another life beyond the page and provides another layer for me to guide the audience’s interpretation of the text. Composing music for my films ties these two elements together, creating a mood that reflects the world in which the poem lives. My work often explores the human experience and the friction between ideals and the status quo. I have an intimate relationship with my art, I measure myself against it and I strive to narrow the space between me and it.

Silicon Valley

Mary McDonald, filmmaker

Penn Kemp, poet

Mary McDonald’s multidisciplinary practice encompasses photography and video montage, stop-motion animation, installation, performance, writing, music and community participatory projects. Mary has been awarded a City of London’s Community Arts Investment Program grant by the London, Canada, Arts Council for her collaboration, River Revery, with poet Penn Kemp. Mary’s photography has been exhibited in London galleries. In 2018, her single-channel installation, Reveries and Truths, was featured at the Visual Fringe in London. Her AR collaboration with Penn Kemp, The Dream Life of Teresa Harris, was exhibited at London’s historic Eldon House during July, 2018. Her work has appeared in such publications as Synaeresis: Arts + PoetryThe New Quarterly and Ocassus, and her play, 13 inches of closet space was produced as part of the 2017 London One Act Festival. Mary is currently working on a poetry film and AR installation collaboration with Syrian poet, Mohamad Kebbewar and Serbian-born poet, Natasha Boskic, On the Margins of History

Canadian poet, performer and playwright Penn Kemp has been lauded as a trailblazer, “a poetic El Nino” and a “one-woman literary industry.” A keen participant in Canada’s cultural life, she was London, Canada’s inaugural poet laureate. Penn is the author of 30 books of poetry, prose and drama. Her 2018 books of poetry are Local Heroes (Insomniac Press) and Fox Haunts (Aeolus House). Forthcoming is River Revery (Insomniac Press, 2019). She is thrilled to collaborate with the uber-talented Mary McDonald on River Revery.

Turkey Teacher

Barbara West, poet and performer

David Mai, filmmaker

Barbara West’s unique performance style comes from her background in theater and rock n’ roll. It is less like poetry reading and more like a cross between stand-up comedy and stand-up meditation. Barbara’s 16 years as a student of Shambhala Buddhism and 12-step Recovery provide the spiritual foundation for her work. She has been writing poetry since age 6, but stopped several years ago when her file cabinet filled up. Thanks to support from the Sacramento and Davis poetry communities, she’s thrilled to be writing again. Her publications include Full of Crow, Brevities, Medusa’sKitchen, Sacramento Voices, Swarthmore College Bulletin, Small Craft Warnings, Escarp, and Davis Shambhala Center Newsletter. Barbara enjoys reciting from memory, which allows her to use her whole body to present a poem, usually without a mic, since her voice is plenty loud.  She also enjoys windsurfing.

David Mai is a filmmaker who has directed over a dozen short films and has been on student and professional sets. His focus is on post-production as he primarily works as a picture editor. His interests include horror, sexuality, and feminist film theory. In addition to editing multiple short to feature length films, he is proficient with industry-grade cinematography, lighting, and sound equipment. With knowledge of a variety of software, he is adept at cutting film, mixing sound, and designing motion graphics and VFX. Furthermore, he has participated in conferences and published papers in media scholarship. Critical theory is as important to him as filmmaking.

Untitled

Lisa Maione

Info Unavailable

The Wanderers

Ted Fisher, filmmaker

Aoife Lyall, poet

Ted Fisher is an American film director specializing in arts and culture documentaries. His short films have screened at over 30 festivals around the world. He is currently working toward an M.F.A. in Film Directing at the University of Edinburgh.

Shortlisted twice for the Hennessy New Writers Award, Aoife Lyall’s work has appeared in Poetry Ireland Review, The Stinging Fly, Banshee Lit and others. She has just completed her first collection.

ARTIST STATEMENTS:

Ted Fisher: My interest in documentary film as a practice is always connected to the power of the real world as a storyteller. In reading and rereading Aoife Lyall’s poem, I saw it as amplifying a reality I could feel, and I found myself wanting to look and listen further. We shot aspects of her life for several days, with the idea of trusting this as raw material that would meld with the poem in an editing process. I have made many short documentaries, and the best of these have been made from finding a situation where events lead to a real outcome, in front of the camera. Working in connection to a poem (and a poet) shifts this practice to one that is new for me: trying to understand past and present at once. So my approach had to include tuning in to the idea and experience of reflection and reconsideration.

Aoife Lyall: The most significant thing I learned was that the poem isn’t so much about welcoming my daughter into my life, as allowing myself to finally call Inverness home. I lived here for almost six years before she was born, and spent much of that comparing my life here to the life I had in Dublin. Walking the poem with Ted I came to realize it encapsulated what I had been missing: the accumulation of memories, moments and experiences that layer themselves into the familiar. As for collaborating, trust is vital: in the skills you have brought to the project, in the skills of the other party, and in the potential of what you are creating together. So there has to be a relationship there, a mutual respect and a willingness to let someone else explore, and act on, avenues of your work that you may not have considered before. For future projects I would make the point of being able to recite the poem from memory, simply because this makes more filming options available. What would I keep the same? Working with Ted.

Wind and Plaster

Burak  Kum

Info unavailable.

 

Wishing Well

Mary McDonald, filmmaker

Penn Kemp, poet

Mary McDonald’s multidisciplinary practice encompasses photography and video montage, stop-motion animation, installation, performance, writing, music and community participatory projects. Mary has been awarded a City of London’s Community Arts Investment Program grant by the London, Canada, Arts Council for her collaboration, River Revery, with poet Penn Kemp. Mary’s photography has been exhibited in London galleries. In 2018, her single-channel installation, Reveries and Truths, was featured at the Visual Fringe in London. Her AR collaboration with Penn Kemp, The Dream Life of Teresa Harris, was exhibited at London’s historic Eldon House during July, 2018. Her work has appeared in such publications as Synaeresis: Arts + PoetryThe New Quarterly and Ocassus, and her play, 13 inches of closet space was produced as part of the 2017 London One Act Festival. Mary is currently working on a poetry film and AR installation collaboration with Syrian poet, Mohamad Kebbewar and Serbian-born poet, Natasha Boskic, On the Margins of History

Canadian poet, performer and playwright Penn Kemp has been lauded as a trailblazer, “a poetic El Nino” and a “one-woman literary industry.” A keen participant in Canada’s cultural life, she was London, Canada’s inaugural poet laureate. Penn is the author of 30 books of poetry, prose and drama. Her 2018 books of poetry are Local Heroes (Insomniac Press) and Fox Haunts (Aeolus House). Forthcoming is River Revery (Insomniac Press, 2019). She is thrilled to collaborate with the uber-talented Mary McDonald on River Revery.

Without Distortion

Mark Niehus, poet, director, producer and composer

Poet and artist Mark Niehus combines his poetry with digital art, video and music to create outcomes that capture and expand the mood, rhythms and meaning of his writing. After spending years abroad, travelling, studying creative writing and working as a new media designer in London, Mark returned to Australia to publish his first book of poems in 2008 and to focus his artistic practice to create high quality artworks integrated with his writing. Over the last 10 years Mark has conceived and delivered an array of poetry films, projection art, street art, illustrations, installations and has composed spontaneous poems for the public on his typewriter for local government, arts organizations, festivals and numerous solo exhibitions.

ARTIST STATEMENT: I write quickly and instinctively, allowing an interplay between my subconscious and conscious mind until the narrative appears. Writing for me is a very visual experience resulting in vivid imagery which easily translates to film giving the poem another life beyond the page and provides another layer for me to guide the audience’s interpretation of the text. Composing music for my films ties these two elements together, creating a mood that reflects the world in which the poem lives. My work often explores the human experience and the friction between ideals and the status quo. I have an intimate relationship with my art, I measure myself against it and I strive to narrow the space between me and it.